Open 365 days a year Mon-Sat 9:30am-6:00pm | Sun 9:30am-5:30pm. Located at the Broadmoor Hotel at 1 Lake Circle Colorado Springs

      Donkey and Rider

      $600

      #14
      24 X 20.5
      Weaving

      In stock


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                  Historic Navajo Weaving’s from an estate mostly collected in the 1940-50’s.

                  Navajo rugs and blankets are textiles produced by Navajo people of the Four Corners area of the United States. Navajo textiles are highly regarded and have been sought after as trade items for over 150 years. Commercial production of hand-woven blankets and rugs has been an important element of the Navajo economy. As one expert expresses it, “Classic Navajo serapes at their finest equal the delicacy and sophistication of any pre-mechanical loom-woven textile in the world.”

                  Navajo textiles were originally utilitarian blankets for use as cloaks, dresses, saddle blankets, and similar purposes. Toward the end of the 19th century, weavers began to make rugs for tourism and export. Typical Navajo textiles have strong geometric patterns. They are a flat tapestry-woven textile produced in a fashion similar to kilims of Eastern Europe and Western Asia, but with some notable differences. In Navajo weaving, the slit weave technique common in kilims is not used, and the warp is one continuous length of yarn, not extending beyond the weaving as fringe. Traders from the late 19th and early 20th century encouraged adoption of some kilim motifs into Navajo designs.

                  Traditional Navajo weaving used upright looms with no moving parts. Support poles were traditionally constructed of wood; steel pipe is more common today. The artisan sits on the floor during weaving and wraps the finished portion of fabric underneath the loom as it grows. The average weaver takes anywhere from 2 months to many years to finish a single rug. The size greatly determines the amount of time spent weaving a rug. The ratio of weft towarp threads had a fine count before the Bosque Redondo internment and declined in the following decades, then rose somewhat to a mid-range ratio of five to one for the period 1920-1940. 19th-century warps were colored hand spun wool or cotton string, then switched to white hand spun wool in the early decades of the 20th century. Weaving plays a role in the creation myth of Navajo cosmology, which articulates social relationships and continues to play a role in Navajo culture. According to one aspect of this tradition, a spiritual being called “Spider Woman” instructed the women of the Navajo how to build the first loom from exotic materials including sky, earth, sun-rays, rock crystal, and sheet lightning. Then “Spider Woman” taught the Navajo how to weave on it.

                  Use of traditional motifs sometimes leads to the mistaken notion that these textiles serve a purpose in Navajo religion. Actually these items have no use as prayer rugs or any other ceremonial function, and controversy has existed among the Navajo about the appropriateness of including religious symbolism in items designed for commercial sale. The financial success of purported ceremonial rugs led to their continued production.

                  From Wikipedia.

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                          To our Valued Customers

                           

                          During this time of crisis, when our lives are upended daily as new information is available, John Marzolf and the staff at the Broadmoor Galleries want to extend our heartfelt gratitude for your partnership and loyalty.  We are reminded of our strength in the community during this moment and we are truly grateful for our extended family.  We have been contacted by many of our artists, who are also concerned about our current events and they’ve decided to lower their prices during these uncertain times.  We know that as the world seems to stand, still life continues to happen - birthdays, anniversaries, Easter and Mother’s Day all will still occur and these lower prices will ease the strain at this time.  Inquire about specific pieces and Krista or Jamie will let you know the temporality lowered prices.

                          Currently, our physical locations will not be open to the public.  We hope to reopen with the Broadmoor Resort and Properties on May 22nd for Memorial Day Weekend.  Until then we plan to be fully functional through our website, social media, email, phone calls, and texts.  Explore our website’s new chat feature for immediate contact with an associate.  If you have any questions about our pieces or artists please reach out.  Our associates are able to respond to any of your inquiries and will do so promptly.

                          Gallery Directors
                          Krista Steed
                          719.577.5744
                          Email

                          Jamie Oberloh
                          719.577.5764
                          Email

                          John Marzolf
                          Owner
                          Broadmoor Galleries
                          928.231.3564
                          Email

                          We are able to ship products directly to you or arrange a safe pick up at an offsite location. If there is anything we’ve missed or any other way we can help you please let us know!

                          We’ll get through this together. Sincerely,

                          John Marzolf and the Broadmoor Galleries Staff